Feminism

It started with the #MeToo movement and the courageous voices that demanded the change that was long overdue. These episodes focus on feminism, women’s empowerment, and highlighting the inequities in society.

Ep 6 – Stay Out Of My Uterus

Bold & Bawdy Episode 6

Stay Out of My Uterus

 

Episode Description:

In this episode we talk about reproductive rights and how the Trump administration has made shady moves that threaten women’s health and reproductive liberty. Get informed and take action, the midterm elections are just around the corner.   

 

Maddie opens the episode with a state of of affairs for women since Trump took office, and

questions why so many decisions tied to women’s sexual rights are made by 90% old white men. Lina D can’t stand the multiple conversations led by men regarding what women should be doing with their bodies. Westley talks about his fear of Handmaid’s Tale becoming a reality in this political environment.

Trump, Pence, the administration and Congress had already targeted women in the first 100 days in office. Read below for a quick recap of the issues. Want to learn more? Read this article from Planned Parenthood.

  1. Trying to Strip Maternity Care to Help Pass the ACA Repeal Bill: Pence and the House Freedom Caucus negotiated to revive the failed ACA repeal bill by giving states the option to eliminate plan coverage of the essential health benefits (EHBs). EHBs are core health care services that the majority of plans must cover under ACA. This includes maternity and newborn coverage, mental health and substance abuse treatment, and prescription drugs. This proposal eliminates maternity care, reduces women’s access to birth control, and raises insurance costs for women. It would create a situation where women may not be able to prevent pregnancy and get medical care once they’re pregnant.
  2. Undermining Protections for Title X, the Nation’s Family Planning Program: Title X is a law passed in 1970 by Nixon. It was the first federal subsidy to help lower-income families obtain access to birth control which started in 1965 as part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty.” Nixon thought the subsidies were not adequate and they were expanded. On March 30, Pence cast a vote in the Senate to dismantle President Obama’s rule protecting access to basic health care services through Title X and then Trump signed the bill into law. Under the Obama administration, the rule allowed for patients to have access to critical Title X care from the most qualified family planning provider available, regardless of whether it separately provided abortion services. Under the new law, anti-women’s health state politicians can block patients with low incomes from getting care from reproductive health care providers, including Planned Parenthood because they also provide safe, legal abortion.
  3. Confirming Anti-Abortion Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court: 63% of voters agree with the landmark Supreme Court decision on abortion, while 31% disagree. There is a small gender divide on the issue, with women agreeing on the decision at 65% and men just four points behind. On April 7, Trump’s allies in the Senate voted to confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court by a thin vote. Gorsuch’s judicial record threatens reproductive health and rights. Over the next few years, the Supreme Court could rule on laws that undermine access to basic health care, target the LGBTQ community for discrimination, and deny the essential right to safe and legal abortion. Justice Gorsuch has a history of going to extraordinary lengths to interfere with reproductive health and rights, and his alarming record and judicial philosophy leave no doubt that he will vote to restrict access to abortion.

 

We also cover the most recent policy

  • proposal by Trump administration to bar clinics that provide abortion services or referrals from receiving family-planning funds
  • This Impacts the $260 million Title X program- which provides basic primary and preventive services for low-income women and families.
  • The defense used is that this will ensure that taxpayers do not “indirectly fund abortions.”
  • The program could lead to doctors not being allowed to discuss comprehensive health-care options.
  • Planned Parenthood, which serves 41% of the 4 million people who get care through the program, could lose as much as $60 million in funding.

 

The Story in Iowa– a case study that shows the impacts to how Title X funds will be blocked

  • 4 Iowa centers closed, drops the state’s number of clinics to 8 effective June 30 and disrupts care for some 15,000 patients.
  • Gov. Terry Branstad signed legislation into law in May, so that Iowa could decline $3 million in federal Medicaid money that funded family planning. The state declined the funding dollars on the grounds it did not want to funnel taxpayer money into abortion services
  • BUT funds are rarely used for abortion. It pays for other treatments a person might seek at a gynecologist or a urologist. People impacted might not be able to afford those visits otherwise.
  • Centers closed:
    • Sioux City, served 4,810 patients
    • rural Keokuk center, served 1,871 people and existed as the sole provider for 92% of family planning patients from surrounding Lee County in 2015
    • Burlington center, served 4,187 patients and offers crucial care to a medically underserved population
    • Quad City, Bettendorf center, served 3,829 patients.

 

The Facts on how the funding is used

  • Planned Parenthood receives over $500 million from the federal government each year in the form of Medicaid reimbursements and Title X grants.
  • Title X applies only to family planning: contraception, pelvic exams, HIV testing, pap smears, cancer screenings, all for impoverished and low-income patients seeking services at a publicly funded clinic.
  • It never funds abortion, but Trump gave states the go-ahead to withhold Title X funds from family planning entities that offer abortion services anyway.
  • Medicaid, is only used to pay for abortion when an unwanted pregnancy results from rape or incest, and when a pregnancy threatens the life or health of the mother.
  • Exceptions are rare: 2010 saw 331 Medicaid-funded abortions. For reference, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention logged 765,651 abortions for 2010.
  • In 2015, publicly funded clinics in Iowa helped prevent 11,000 unintended pregnancies and 4,000 abortions.

 

Know the Issues and Get Involved

https://www.prochoiceamerica.org/

 

What do you know about the issues related to:

  • Abortion
  • Birth Control
  • Fighting Pregnancy Discrimination
  • Paid Family Leave

 

Resources

https://statusofwomendata.org/explore-the-data/reproductive-rights/#section-a

 

Ep 46 – Down With The Patriarchy

This isn’t the first time we talk about the #MeToo movement and women’s empowerment, but it is the first time that we take on the patriarchy. Is this episode we clearly define the word and provide examples of what you can be doing to deconstruct the long standing system.

What is the basic definition of the patriarchy?  This site gives us a great definition and framework that we used to guide our discussion. The patriarchy “is generally not an explicit ongoing effort by men to dominate women. It is a long-standing system that we are born into and participate in, mostly unconsciously.”

Below you can find the defnition and framework we used in the beginning of the episode:

  1. Male dominated
  2. Organized around an obsession with control
  3. Male identified  
  4. Male centered

 

We talk through some examples where women are challenging the status quo and making progress:

  1. Male domination: men often occupy the most important and visible roles such as executives, politicians, public leaders. But 2016 saw an Influx of women in politics. We talk about the example of Emily’s List, the largest national organization devoted to electing female candidates. They reported that in the 10 months before the election in 2016, about 1,000 women contacted her organization about running for office or getting involved in other ways. Since the election the number has exploded to more than 22,000.
  2. Trends that start to challenge the definition of the “traditional” home. Social structures have created a view of the home where the man is the main breadwinner while the woman stays at home to raise the children. Over the years there has been a significant increase in the number of stay at home dads- its doubled since 1989. You can read more in this article from Pew Social Trends.

It takes time to challenge the social structures that people have grown up with in order to make a change, it is going to require more than just one conversation. Although we know that there is value in having the conversations, the next step is to think about how you can play a role in taking action. We shift to talk about specific examples of how the the patriarchy has come to life in our experiences and discuss some of the things we can do to challenge the status quo. Lina D and Maddie talk about their experiences in the workplace. And we reference an example from @2wokegurlspodcast.

What will you do to take down the patriarchy?

Ep 45 – That’s What I Like

It’s been a minute, but we finally bring you another listener inspired episode. We wanted to continue the conversation that started in our preview post for Ep. 42- It’s a Numbers Game on instagram. What is the difference between preferences and body shaming? Join the conversation!

In this listener inspired episode we talk about the differences between body shaming and preferences. Here is the backstory: in Episode 42: It’s a Numbers Game we talked about various dating and sex topics that have something to do with numbers. Our preview inspired a conversation on instagram, you can check it out here. We have posted a portion of the comments below too.

@Theearthmomma: I think shaming men for their dick size is the equivalent of body shaming women. There’s such a double standard when it comes to this. Men need to step it up and learn how to please women in different ways other than intercourse, AND women need to step it up and demand better lovers and stop letting toxic masculinity inside of their yonis. Accepting drunken insecure men inside of us is allowing men to be weak lovers. No more faking it when it really doesn’t feel good. No more douche bags. Women have the power to force men to step up their character. Another topic you guys have brought up that seems funny on the surface but really has way more depth to climb in to

@_nofreedrinks: @theearthmomma thanks so much for your comment! You are right that this topic has a lot more layers than we speak to in this episode. I’ve hadn’t thought about shaming dick size as the equivalent of body shaming for women. I appreciate you adding that perspective because it’s true- focusing on size is another way to objectify. I agree on your point completely about women stepping up and demanding more and not settling. -Lina D

@tone__da: @theearthmomma I agree with you but it’s good to bring to light what some women do see as a requirement. It’s not right but it’s reality too.

@Alastaircunning: @theearthmomma Body shaming is obviously bad. But expressing a physical preference in a sexual partner is not inherently shaming to those who aren’t endowed with that preference. And it need not be objectifying to the fortunately endowed person either. Treat everyone like a full subjectively experiencing human being, not just a means to an end but an end in themselves, and express any preference with due sensitivity to those who don’t measure up and I think we in the ethical clear. After all, encouraging women to suppress a legitimate sexual preference is hardly a healthy way to go either…

 

Before we dive into the conversation in the episode we define a couple of the words that are used a lot but are seldom fully understood:

Body shaming (noun)– the action or practice of humiliating someone by making mocking or critical comments about their body shape or size

Toxic masculinity- defined by adherence to traditional male gender roles that restrict the kinds of emotions allowable for boys and men to express, including social expectations that men seek to be dominant (the “alpha male”) and limit their emotional range primarily to expressions of anger.

This instagram conversation inspired a great discussion between the NFD co-hosts. Here are some of the points we raised. Listen to the episode for more!

 

  • Westley- “I think that when it comes to both body shaming and preferences there is a fine line between shaming and liking something about someone.”
  • Maddie- “I don’t know a guys dick size till I see it so I can’t technically shame him, just saying.”
  • Maddie- “There’s a difference between politely saying I no longer want to sleep with you vs. I won’t talk to you at all cause you don’t fit certain parameters. Secondly is it body shaming if I’m just saying what I find attractive?  I personally prefer dark skin men, that doesn’t mean I don’t think any light skin men or men or other nationalities are attractive, I am just more sexually aroused and my interest is piqued by dark skinned men.”
  • Lina D- “I am always sensitive when expressing my preferences with a new partner. I don’t want to say something that triggers a reaction, so I am never rude. I will diplomatically express my disinterest and keep it moving.”

We somehow started talking about the dick slang- we couldn’t help ourselves. Here is the link to the video we mentioned.

And finally some good reads we want to share:

Have another point of view we didn’t represent? Send us a note using our contact us form.

Ep 44 – Get That Equal Pay!

This is a calling to all the women who work hard and take pride in their professional accomplishments. This week’s episode commemorates Equal Pay Day which took place on April 10th in the U.S. Advocacy should happen throughout the year, and you are accountable for your pay everyday. Listen to this episode to learn more about resources and tips to make sure you get your equal pay!

What is Equal Pay Day? It is a day meant to show how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year.  The actual day varies depending on the year and the country. Germany is another country who celebrates the day. It might seem that acknowledging that women are not being paid equally for equal work is no cause for celebration, but by spreading awareness of the issue then we can collectively and individually take action.

This year, the day took place on April 10th. And a new addition for this year, is laying out equal pay days by ethnicity. See below for the days:

February 22, 2018 Asian American women’s Equal Pay Day

April 10, 2018 All women’s Equal Pay Day

April 17, 2018 White women’s Equal Pay Day

August 7, 2018 Black women’s Equal Pay Day

September 27, 2018 Native women’s Equal Pay Day

November 1, 2018 Latinas’ Equal Pay Day

We referenced percentages on the episode and we obtained that data from the Vox article: The Gender and Racial Wage Gap

White Men $22 100%
White Women $18 81%
Black $14 64%
Latina $12 55%

We talk about the American Association of University Women founded in 1881 and their mission to advance equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. Check them out for some good educational resources including how you can find out the gender pay gap in your state.  The interactive map helps you find out the strength of the equal pay laws in the state of interest. We talked about the highest gaps:

  1. Louisiana- 70%
  2. Utah- 70%
  3. West Virginia- 72%

And where we have made some progress but are not there yet:

  1. New York- 89%
  2. California- 88%
  3. Florida- 87%

We go through our experiences and highlight actions so that you can take ownership for narrowing your pay gap. We cover the topics below and more. Make sure you listen to this episode!

  • Take a negotiation course
  • Do your research-Maddie- starts from the initial interview not even at the negotiating table- glassdoor; salary.com; etc
  • Quantify your value

 

Ep 41 – Me Too: No More Domestic Violence

The next episode of our Me Too series is here. The beginning of this year has highlighted that domestic violence is sadly still plaguing homes. We wanted to talk about the different ways domestic violence takes a toll on homes and individuals and highlight how pervasive of an issue this is across society.

We reference a video and a movie in this episode, if you listened and want to check it out, the links to view it or learn more are here:

What Would You Do – Domestic Violence and Abuse in PUBLIC! (Social Experiment)

Crazy in Alabama

 

We open the episode by discussing the different types of domestic violence and sharing some of our experiences.

The different types of abuse:

  • Physical: You may be experiencing physical abuse if your partner has done or repeatedly does any of the following tactics of abuse
  • Emotional: You may be in an emotionally/verbally abusive relationship if you partner exerts control through
  • Sexual:  Sexually abusive methods of retaining power and control include an abusive partner:
  • Reproductive: Reproductive coercion is a form of power and control where one partner strips the other of the ability to control their own reproductive system. It is sometimes difficult to identify this coercion because other forms of abuse are often occurring simultaneously.
  • Financial: Economic or financial abuse is when an abusive partner extends their power and control into the area of finances. This abuse can take different forms, including an abusive partner
  • Digital: Digital abuse is the use of technologies such as texting and social networking to bully, harass, stalk or intimidate a partner. Often this behavior is a form of verbal or emotional abuse perpetrated online. You may be experiencing digital abuse if your partner:

 

We found a visual that helps understand the various dimensions of abuse and how someone could be experiencing either one or more types at the same time. Visit the link to learn more.

We take a look at domestic violence trends:

  • Globally, men who are exposed to domestic violence as children are 3-4 times more likely to perpetrate acts of domestic violence as adults than men who weren’t.
  • Homicide is one of the leading causes of death for women aged ≤44 years.* In 2015, homicide caused the death of 3,519 girls and women in the United States. Rates of female homicide vary by race/ethnicity (1), and nearly half of victims are killed by a current or former male intimate partner

We also cover off on some of the biased points of view that are held when it comes to domestic violence:

  • Societies willful ignorance: “It’s understandable what she means there, but perhaps it’s time our society started to think of physical abuse, possessiveness and men’s entitlement to act in those ways toward women as terroristic, violent and radical.”
  • Men are victims too: We found how limited resources are for men that have experienced domestic violence. There are a lot of staggering facts, and we spend time talking about this topic because it is important to note that domestic violence can impact anyone and all victims should all be able to get help. Read more here. We highlighted the ones we found most surprising below.
  • Almost half (48.8 percent) of all men have dealt with some sort of psychological aggression by an intimate partner. This number is equal to women at 48.4 percent.
  • Nearly 1 in 18 men have been stalked by an intimate partner to the point they were scared for their life or safety or the lives or safety of loved ones.
  • An estimated 10.4 percent or approximately 11.7 million men in the U.S. have reported having an intimate partner get or attempt to get pregnant when the male partner didn’t agree to it.
  • About 2 in 5 gay and bisexual men will experience intimate partner violence in their lifetime.

It is important to know that you can get help, and as someone that wants to make a change, know you can also donate your time to help others.

  • There are national and local organizations to get help if you or someone you know are victims of domestic violence
  • If you’re not most of these organizations are always looking for volunteers or donations so if you have the time please give your time or money

Ep 40 – No Means No

What role does the incident involving Aziz Ansari and Grace play in the #MeToo movement? Now that the story has been out for a few weeks the No Free Drinks crew revisits this controversial topic and peels back the different layers that contributed to what occurred. At the center, the words “no means no” and the acknowledgement of these words holds the key to preventing situations like this to happen.

“The worst night of my life,” assault, bad date- are some of the many references that have been used to describe the story published by babe.net. There are many different angles to discuss and this episode is meant to talk about the deeper points that are highlighted by this incident. We will go through the different events of the night, discuss our points of view, and ultimately dissect how interactions when dating and different ways of communicating can lead to confusion that could result in someone getting hurt.

Let’s talk about Aziz, below is a word for word recap of the events of the night that we think are important to talk about:

The story of Grace:

  • Where the first red flag was: In a second, his hand was on my breast.” Then he was undressing her, then he undressed himself. She remembers feeling uncomfortable at how quickly things escalated.
  • When Ansari told her he was going to grab a condom within minutes of their first kiss, Grace voiced her hesitation explicitly. “I said something like, ‘Whoa, let’s relax for a sec, let’s chill.’” She says he then resumed kissing her, briefly performed oral sex on her, and asked her to do the same thing to him. She did, but not for long. “It was really quick. Everything was pretty much touched and done within ten minutes of hooking up, except for actual sex.”
  • “It was 30 minutes of me getting up and moving and him following and sticking his fingers down my throat again. It was really repetitive. It felt like a fucking game.”
  • she says she used verbal and non-verbal cues to indicate how uncomfortable and distressed she was. “Most of my discomfort was expressed in me pulling away and mumbling. I know that my hand stopped moving at some points,” she said. “I stopped moving my lips and turned cold.”
  • “I said I don’t want to feel forced because then I’ll hate you, and I’d rather not hate you,” she said.
  • At this point she thought the sexual encounter was over
  • “He sat back and pointed to his penis and motioned for me to go down on him. And I did. I think I just felt really pressured. It was literally the most unexpected thing I thought would happen at that moment because I told him I was uncomfortable.”
  • “He [made out] with me again and says, ‘Doesn’t look like you hate me.’”
  • ‘How about we just chill, but this time with our clothes on?’”
  • “I remember saying, ‘You guys are all the same, you guys are all the fucking same.’”
  • He hugged her and kissed her goodbye, another “aggressive” kiss.
  • “I cried the whole ride home. At that point I felt violated. That last hour was so out of my hand.”

The sequence of these events led to various conversations and revealed different points of view.  This articlefrom the Lily does a good job of exploring different points of view. Maddie, Westley, and Lina D picked the ones that resonated the most with them and discuss.

 

  1. Erica Linebacker Hoffmeister: “I do think there’s a place for this experience in a DIFFERENT conversation. How women feel like we owe men something sexually, how elusive consent can feel, how strange it is we sometimes lose our confident voices in sexual situations, how complex sex is emotionally even when we go in with different expectations … all of those issues deserve a platform in the feminist discussion. I can relate. And it’s problematic and f — ked up. But this is an account of a gross, regrettable situation that could have turned out terrible. This particular account is not ASSAULT. How can we find our voices as women, and become sexually positive and confident, and STOP sexual assault with accusations like these that minimize and trivialize the whole movement and bring us steps backward?”
  2. Quinn Biscoff: “I think it opens up important discussions that men need to listen more and women need to talk more. A massive cultural change is hopefully taking place.
  3. Anita Cake: “To me, a large degree of assault is about intent. Did Aziz intend to hurt this girl or was he genuinely not picking up on her nonverbal cues? Should he be punished for what he did or be allowed to learn from it? That’s where I’m stuck.”
  4. Brittany Cliffe: “She refused him multiple times, both verbally and physically showing her discomfort, and he continued to pursue her and physically touch her. He did not ask for consent (other than ‘Where should I f — k you?’), and she never gave consent to any of those actions. THAT’S ASSAULT. … Coercion is NOT consent.”

As we continue the conversation we come to a controversial but important question, “does no ever NOT mean no?” Examples are cited by men and women alike where there is an element of playing hard to get. We also discuss Maddie’s story with Jim and the fine lines that exist between persistence and harassment.

We had so much to talk about in this episode and we went longer than we were anticipating. We will be releasing another episode in the future to talk about toxic masculinity and what we need to do better to avoid these situations.

Ep 39 – Swipe Right For Aggressive

This episode is here to keep unacceptable online behavior in check! Have you experienced aggressive behavior when you are on dating apps or sites? It happens way to frequently and we want to bring awareness to it, give advice to those who have experienced it, and confront those who think it is normal to be aggressive online.

 

We didn’t want to perpetuate gender biases so we looked up information to understand who is experiencing aggressive behaviors with online dating. This study from Binghamton finds that men are more aggressive on online dating sites and have certain behaviors that are distinct to males. Men tend to be focused on their own interests and are usually oblivious toward their attractiveness to potential dates, while females are more conscious of their own attractiveness.

While the study was interesting, we also wanted to understand people’s experiences. We came to the conclusion that aggressive online dating habits are so commonplace that people have performed experiments to showcase the types of reactions they encounter. Below you will find links and images of the types of responses we found. We discuss these in the episode, but we wanted to provide you the links to raise awareness and bring to life the disturbing aspects of online dating.

  • Man who posed as a woman i.e. reddit user
  • An account from user “Too Afraid”: I received death threats 4rm a man I met on POF, after I spoke w him several times over the cell. I cancelled meeting him & he sent me at least 20 very threatening & disgusting text msg. One was a sex act, one a pic of his bowel movement. He said he will find me & kill me. He’s a phychopath & my gun stays w me now at all times. I thank God I didn’t meet this phyco, I have filed a police report & saved the text msgs. I blocked him after the texts wouldn’t stop. I’ve spoken w several men & when I felt they weren’t the one I moved on as did they. Women please please b careful – have the long talks letting them talk more – they will tell u all u need without knowing. Follow ur gut. I never spoke about sex w this freak but he accused me of playing sex games. One pic was a woman’s butt filled w sperm he said “eat my cum out her ass bitch” “die bitch” “I will find u & kill u” …Terrifying that I met someone straight out a serial killer movie or criminal minds. He even sat on a xerox machine & sent a pic of that. I hope he gets locked up. Mind u this man “seemed ” normal until I stopped talking to him.

 

Maddie and Lina D share their experiences with aggressive behaviors. Westley talks about how he believes the behavior is wrong and gives us his advice from a male point of view.  

There is a pattern with these aggressive interactions, here is a high level view:

  1. Men say Hi and after getting a response steer the conversation to be overly sexual without prompting
  2. Leads to women ignoring messages that are not well thought out
  3. Men blame the women

We discuss our questions to the overly aggressive guy:

  • Why do the conversations become sexual so fast?
  • Why are you in a rush?
  • Do you not care about being seen as a creep?
  • Do you want to stay alone?
  • You know I can just block you right?

To close the episode, we give advice to what should be done when this behavior is encountered and we go after those overly aggressive guys with our words. Stop! You know we can block you right?

Ep 38 – Momma Always Said

We continue to celebrate the women that inspire us, and this week we dedicate this episode to our mommas! Whether you consider your mom your best friend, or whether she drives you crazy, OR both, moms hold a special place in our hearts. They have shaped who we are and not matter what we always remember their advice. Get to know us a bit better by listening to what momma always said to us.

 

Moms always give their advice and opinions on how they see life. Whether its cultural norms around dating, relationships, or career-related, these points of view were beaten into our heads. Some advice we took and it shaped who we are today, other pieces of advice we chose not to and it was okay because we are still amazing people!

Each co-host talks about their cultural background and highlights most important things their families brought up when they were growing up. Some of the topics that were the most popular topics where: dating & sex, gender roles, and career.

When it came to dating, relationships, and sex our mothers always turned to religion to explain why this topic shouldn’t even be worth our attention. And the most common thing momma said, “you have to wait until you are married.”

We discuss gender roles, and how actions from family reinforced certain gender stereotypes. Maddie describes how Haitian culture is very patriarchal, and that women were taught to be domestic. Momma always said, “no man will ever marry you if you can’t [insert domestic activity here].”

When it came to careers we learned that the approach between our families varied. For Lina D, momma always said, “education is key.” Whereas Westley and Maddie would always hear that they could only pursue a career that “brought honor to the family.”

We get into other nitty gritties of our childhood and what it was like growing up Latinx and Haitian. To close the episode we talk about our favorite pieces of advice that we would keep and pass down to younger siblings, friends, future children, and other loved ones.

Ep 37 – Press For Progress

Our tribute to the badass women that have made things happen, that haven’t taken no for an answer, and that refuse to be tied down to the norm. March is Women’s History Month and tomorrow, March 8th, is International Women’s Day.

Do you know the history behind International Women’s Day started? International Women’s Day grew out of the labour movement to become a UN-recognised annual event, The first activism tied to the movement happened in 1908 when 15,000 women marched through New York City demanding shorter working hours, better pay and the right to vote. It took time for the day to be officially celebrated, but in 1911 Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland became the first countries to celebrate. 2018 marks the 107th celebration.

Today is a day to celebrate how far women have come in society, politics and economics, and indirectly raise awareness of continued inequality. In our tribute to international women’s day- we talk about how women have been making strides in history to gradually change the game in normally male dominated spaces- particularly those related to sex and sexuality.

You know we always have to get into the history. We wanted to pinpoint the event that offset women’s sexual revolution. The revolution started with the launch of the 1st birth control pill, enovid went on market in 1960. The pill was a game changer because it was the first time women had a reliable way to exercise reproductive control over their own body without needing their sexual partner’s consent. Within five years, 6 million American women were on the pill.

Some other interesting facts that quantify the impact of the pill and it’s contribution to the sexual revolution:

  • 1950s, six in ten women were virgins at marriage and 87 percent of American women believed that it was wrong for a woman to engage in premarital sex, even with “a man she is going to marry.
  • Only two in ten of them would be virgins at marriage.

That’s history, but it’s also many years ago. The sexual revolution continues to take place today. Maddie, Westley, and Lina D talk about the things they have noticed in our personal lives that embody what the sexual revolution means to us.

The NFD crew then talks about the male face of porn and discuss their points of view on what mainstream porn looks like- in a nutshell the main focus on male pleasure. Fortunately, there have been many women that have picked up on the biased perspective and have done something to change the dynamic in the industry.

Women noticed the biased perspective as early as the 1980’s and one of the pioneers in the porn industry was Candida Royalle, born on October 15, 1950 as Candice Marion Vadala. Her films showcased a woman’s perspective in a male dominated industry.  She made it a point to change the storyline depicted in porn, writing and producing films that were rooted in realistic demonstration of sex that could be enjoyed by men and women alike. She was a feminist, a businesswoman, and an activist. She influenced change, increase racial diversity in porn, and made porn more inclusive for women- consumers and creators alike, through her business platform.

Women continue to change the porn industry today.  Many porn stars and other sex workers believe that violence and sexual assault is an “occupational hazard” that comes with the job. Women are challenging the norm and starting their own porn production companies that create environments that are safer. Paulita Pappel is one of these women. She runs a by-women-for-women porn site, Ersties, that specializes in female-friendly sex.  Ersties is all about 100% real girls experiencing 100% real intimate moments. In this article she talks about how she doesn’t want to have to watch an adult film and wonder, “Does that woman on screen really want to be doing that?”

Westley, Lina D, and Maddie close the episode by talking about where we still can make progress.

Ep 28 – Me Too: A Series

In this episode we will give a recap of the movement behind me too and how people who have suffered in silence for years are finally comfortable to speak out against the injustices committed against them. We were inspired by Time Person of the Year 2017: The Silence Breakers. You can read the full article here: http://time.com/time-person-of-the-year-2017-silence-breakers/

 

Lina D and Westley open the episode and talk about why they wanted to create a series around Me Too. Maddie and Niko talk about why they are excited to be guests on this episode and why they think this topic is important.

 

These are the other topics covered in this episode:

  • Co-hosts share their experiences with assault or harassment and highlight what they did to deal with it
  • Touch on points of view heard from others that we disagree with
  • What can we do to create safer spaces
  • Our views on how we can continue to push change

 

This is our last episode of 2017. We wish you happy holidays and a very happy new year. Can’t wait to come back in 2018!